Agreement with Altima to Produce Cheap & Clean Hydrogen in Alberta & British-Colombia

MONTREAL, QC / ACCESSWIRE / February 14, 2023 / St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. (CSE:SX)(OTCQB:SXOOF)(FSE:85G1) is pleased to announce that its subsidiary H2SX and Altima Resources Limited (TSX-V: ARH) have entered into an agreement via a binding term sheet to move forward with the production of cheap and clean hydrogen (ccH2™) in Canada.

Altima has expressed its intention to use H2SX’s hydrogen production (ccH2™) and nano-carbon technology for the conversion of natural gas originating from gas & condensate wells in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada. H2SX will partner and will work on an exclusive basis with Altima in British Columbia and Alberta in the natural gas domain and for projects and companies that have traditional natural gas production of 65 MMcf/d or less.

In accordance with the provisions of the Terms (ccH2™) Altima will issue to H2SX 6,000,000 common shares upon the completion of milestones as set out in the performance shares schedule (the “Performance Shares“) below:

  • 2,000,000 shares to be issued upon delivery of a preliminary technological engineering report.
  • 2,000,000 shares to be issued upon receipt of a detailed engineering report tailored to Altima’s initial project.
  • 2,000,000 shares upon the delivery of a Preliminary Economical Assessment or a Prefeasibility Study.

These shares will be subject to such further restrictions on resale as may apply under applicable securities laws. The close of the issuance of shares is subject to further review and acceptance by the TSX Venture Exchange.

In addition to the issuance of Performance Shares, Altima has committed to the construction of a hydrogen processing facility utilizing the patented technology. Altima will fund and be co-operator of the hydrogen production plant(s) in relation to the gas wells it currently operates and in the future. One hundred percent of all capital expenditures will be reimbursed to Altima prior to any profit sharing between the joint venture parties.

Altima will be responsible to provide and manage the natural gas input into the joint venture operations and all infrastructures and logistics associated with it and will receive credits for the sale of hydrocarbons to the green hydrogen operation through this producing joint venture.

H2SX and its partner will be entitled to receive a 5% NRR for which a long form royalty agreement (the “Royalty Agreement“) will be executed and will be an integral part of the Joint Venture Agreement between the parties; A formal management structure for the anticipated joint venture will be put in place between the parties.

“(…) We look forward to working with H2SX in moving this exciting zero greenhouse gas (CO2) emission hydrogen production technology, into commercialization and for other prospective green tech opportunities that could benefit from utilizing low-cost green hydrogen (…)” said Joe DeVries, President & CEO of Altima Resources.

“(…) Alberta and British Columbia are strategic locations for H2SX. They will benefit from our low-cost, zero greenhouse gas (CO2) emission hydrogen production technology just as we will benefit from the low costs of their natural gas. A perfect synergy between Altima and us for the benefit of all. The production of cheap and clean hydrogen will spark a multitude of other opportunities such as the production of methanol, ammonia, or fertilizers (urea) with a very low environmental footprint. We can only be excited to start this collaboration with Altima as soon as possible (…,)” said Sabin Boily, CEO of H2SX.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

“Frank Dumas”

FRANK DUMAS

Director & COO

About St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp.

St-Georges develops new technologies to solve some of the most common environmental problems in the mining sector, including maximizing metal recovery and full circle EV battery recycling. The Company explores for nickel & PGEs on the Julie Nickel Project and the Manicougan Palladium Project on Quebec’s North Shore and has multiple exploration projects in Iceland, including the Thor Gold Project. Headquartered in Montreal, St-Georges’ stock is listed on the CSE under the symbol SX and trades on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol 85G1 and on the OTCQB Venture Market for early stage and developing U.S. and international companies under the symbol SXOOF. Companies are current in their reporting and undergo an annual verification and management certification process. Investors can find Real-Time quotes and market information for the company on www.otcmarkets.com

The Canadian Securities Exchange (CSE) has not reviewed and does not accept responsibility for the adequacy or the accuracy of the contents of this release.

SOURCE: St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp.

11 States Consider ‘Right to Repair’ for Farming Equipment

On Colorado's northeastern plains, where the pencil-straight horizon divides golden fields and blue sky, a farmer named Danny Wood scrambles to plant and harvest proso millet, dryland corn and winter wheat in short, seasonal windows. That is until his high-tech Steiger 370 tractor conks out.

The tractor's manufacturer doesn't allow Wood to make certain fixes himself, and last spring his fertilizing operations were stalled for three days before the servicer arrived to add a few lines of missing computer code for $950.

"That's where they have us over the barrel, it's more like we are renting it than buying it," said Wood, who spent $300,000 on the used tractor.

Wood's plight, echoed by farmers across the country, has pushed lawmakers in Colorado and 10 other states to introduce bills that would force manufacturers to provide the tools, software, parts and manuals needed for farmers to do their own repairs — thereby avoiding steep labor costs and delays that imperil profits.

"The manufacturers and the dealers have a monopoly on that repair market because it's lucrative," said Rep. Brianna Titone, a Democrat and one of the bill's sponsors. “[Farmers] just want to get their machine going again."

In Colorado, the legislation is largely being pushed by Democrats, while their Republican colleagues find themselves stuck in a tough spot: torn between right-leaning farming constituents asking to be able to repair their own machines and the manufacturing businesses that oppose the idea.

The manufacturers argue that changing the current practice with this type of legislation would force companies to expose trade secrets. They also say it would make it easier for farmers to tinker with the software and illegally crank up the horsepower and bypass the emissions controller — risking operators' safety and the environment.

Similar arguments around intellectual property have been leveled against the broader campaign called 'right to repair,' which has picked up steam across the country — crusading for the right to fix everything from iPhones to hospital ventilators during the pandemic.

In 2011, Congress tried passing a right to repair law for car owners and independent servicers. That bill did not pass, but a few years later, automotive industry groups agreed to a memorandum of understanding to give owners and independent mechanics — not just authorized dealerships — access to tools and information to fix problems.

In 2021, the Federal Trade Commission pledged to beef up its right to repair enforcement at the direction of President Joe Biden. And just last year, Titone sponsored and passed Colorado's first right to repair law, empowering people who use wheelchairs with the tools and information to fix them.

For the right to repair farm equipment — from thin tractors used between grape vines to behemoth combines for harvesting grain that can cost over half a million dollars — Colorado is joined by 10 states including Florida, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas and Vermont.

Many of the bills are finding bipartisan support, said Nathan Proctor, who leads Public Interest Research Group's national right to repair campaign. But in Colorado's House committee on agriculture, Democrats pushed the bill forward in a 9-4 vote along party lines, with Republicans in opposition even though the bill's second sponsor is Republican Representative Ron Weinberg.

"That's really surprising, and that upset me," said the Republican farmer Wood.

Wood's tractor, which flies an American flag reading "Farmers First," isn't his only machine to break down. His grain harvesting combine was dropping into idle, but the servicer took five days to arrive on Wood's farm — a setback that could mean a hail storm decimates a wheat field or the soil temperature moves beyond the Goldilocks zone for planting.

"Our crop is ready to harvest and we can't wait five days, but there was nothing else to do," said Wood. "When it's broke down you just sit there and wait and that's not acceptable. You can be losing $85,000 a day."

Representative Richard Holtorf, the Republican who represents Wood's district and is a farmer himself, said he's being pulled between his constituents and the dealerships in his district covering the largely rural northeast corner of the state. He voted against the measure because he believes it will financially hurt local dealerships in rural areas and could jeopardize trade secrets.

"I do sympathize with my farmers," Holtorf said, but he added, "I don't think it's the role of government to be forcing the sale of their intellectual property."

At the packed hearing last week that spilled into a second room in Colorado's Capitol, the core concerns raised in testimony were farmers illegally slipping around the emissions control and cranking up the horsepower.

"I know growers, if they can change horsepower and they can change emissions they are going to do it," said Russ Ball, sales manager at 21st Century Equipment, a John Deere dealership in Western states.

The bill's proponents acknowledged that the legislation could make it easier for operators to modify horsepower and emissions controls but argued that farmers are already able to tinker with their machines and doing so would remain illegal.

This January, the Farm Bureau and the farm equipment manufacturer John Deere did sign a memorandum of understanding — a right to repair agreement made in the free market and without government intervention. The agreement stipulates that John Deere will share some parts, diagnostic and repair codes and manuals to allow farmers to make their own fixes.

The Colorado bill's detractors laud that agreement as a strong middle ground while Titone said it wasn't enough, evidenced by six of Colorado's biggest farmworker associations that support the bill.

Proctor, who is tracking 20 right to repair proposals in a number of industries across the country, said the memorandum of understanding has fallen far short.

"Farmers are saying no," Proctor said. "We want the real thing."

Source: Voice of America

Ohio Derailment Aftermath: How Worried Should People Be?

Plumes of smoke, questions about dead animals, worries about the drinking water. A train derailment in Ohio and subsequent burning of some of the hazardous chemicals has people asking: How worried should they be?

It's been more than a week since about 50 cars of a freight train derailed in a fiery, mangled mess on the outskirts of East Palestine near the Pennsylvania state line, apparently because of a mechanical issue with a rail car axle. No one was injured in that wreck. But concerns about air quality and the hazardous chemicals on board the train prompted some village residents to leave, and officials later ordered the evacuation of the immediate area as fears grew about a potential explosion of smoldering wreckage.

Officials seeking to avoid the danger of an uncontrolled blast chose to intentionally release and burn toxic vinyl chloride from five rail cars, sending flames and black smoke again billowing high into the sky. The jarring scene left people questioning the potential health impacts for residents in the area and beyond, even as authorities maintained they were doing their best to protect people.

In the days since, residents' concerns and questions have only abounded — amplified, in part, by misinformation spreading online.

More on what we know:

Controlled burn

Vinyl chloride is associated with increased risk of certain cancers, and officials at the time warned burning it would release two concerning gases — hydrogen chloride and phosgene, the latter of which was used as a weapon in World War I.

Environmental officials say that monitors detected toxins in the air at the site during the controlled burn and that officials kept people away until that dissipated. They say continuing air monitoring done for the railroad and by government agencies — including testing inside nearly 400 homes — hasn't detected dangerous levels in the area since residents were allowed to return. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has shared air monitoring results online.

Continuing concerns

Even in communities beyond East Palestine, some residents say they worry about long-term effects of even low-grade exposure to contaminants from the site. The village has scheduled a town hall at the local high school Wednesday evening to hear questions from residents, whose concerns have included lingering smells, how to ensure accountability for the cleanup, and what to make of pets and livestock that have appeared ill or died since the derailment.

The risk to such animals is low, according to the Ohio Department of Agriculture, which recommended that people contact a local veterinarian for any concerns about their livestock or pets' health. The department hasn't received any official reports about livestock or pet illnesses or deaths directly related to the incident, though making such a determination would require a necropsy and lab work, the Agriculture Department said.

Ohio Health Department Director Bruce Vanderhoff cautioned at a news conference Tuesday that residents who were worried about lingering odors or headaches since the derailment should know that those can be triggered by contaminant levels in the air that are well below what's unsafe.

The derailment also highlighted questions about railroad safety, though federal data show accidents involving hazardous materials at this scale are very rare. Trains were rolling past East Palestine again soon after the evacuation order was lifted.

Ground and water

Contaminants from derailed cars spilled into some waterways and were toxic to fish, but officials have said drinking water in the area has remained protected.

In addition to vinyl chloride, at least three other substances — butyl acrylate, ethylhexyl acrylate, and ethylene glycol monobutyl — were released into the air, soil or water, according to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency letter putting rail operator Norfolk Southern on notice about its potential liability for cleanup costs.

Norfolk Southern's response has included efforts to remove spilled contaminants from the ground surface and nearby streams, as well as air quality monitoring, soil sampling and residential water well surveys, according to its preliminary remediation plan.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources estimates the spill affected more than 11.2 kilometers (7 miles) of streams and killed some 3,500 fish, mostly small ones such as minnows and darters.

A plume of contaminants that includes butyl acrylate formed in the Ohio River in the first days after the derailment and on Tuesday was flowing slowly, nearing Huntington, West Virginia, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency officials said.

The contaminant amounts found so far don't pose a risk for cities that rely on the river for their drinking water, and the plume is continuing to be diluted as it moves farther along, the state EPA said.

In response, some water companies have shut off their intakes or increased treatment processes as a precaution.

Social media claims

As with any developing situation, misinformation and hyperbole about the derailment have spread online in recent days.

Social media users, for example, falsely claimed that drinking water is contaminated throughout the entire Ohio River basin, when many areas in the multistate region are not affected by the chemical release.

Footage of dark, ominous clouds has also spread with claims it showed East Palestine post-burn, despite the fact that the footage appeared online as early as November 2022.

As information continues to develop, disinformation experts emphasize that people should exercise caution before sharing unverified claims.

Cause of accident

Investigators examined the rail car that initiated the derailment and have surveillance video from a home showing "what appears to be a wheel bearing in the final stage of overheat failure moments before the derailment," the National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday. Its preliminary report is expected in two weeks.

Rail operator Norfolk Southern and the NTSB haven't publicly answered one of the big questions about the February 3 derailment, however: Exactly when was the crew alerted to a mechanical issue with a rail car axle — the suspected cause — and did they respond appropriately?

A wayside defect detector alerted the crew to a mechanical issue "shortly before the derailment," and emergency braking was initiated, a National Transportation Safety Board member said that weekend.

Security video from two businesses in Salem, Ohio, shows the underside of one rail car glowing brightly from an apparent fiery axle, indicating the train might have traveled more than 32.1 kilometers (20 miles) with that malfunction before the derailment, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The NTSB says it's reviewing that video.

Pennsylvania Governor Josh Shapiro said on Tuesday that Norfolk Southern had mismanaged the disaster from the outset and that its actions hampered the response from local and state agencies. He also said the company had been unwilling to look at alternatives to intentionally releasing and burning the five cars filled with vinyl chloride.

"Prioritizing an accelerated and arbitrary timeline to reopen the rail line injected unnecessary risk and created confusion," Shapiro said in a letter to Norfolk Southern CEO Alan Shaw. A message seeking comment was left with the company.

Source: Voice of America

YALELO Fish to boost over 7000 youth with employment opportunities

KAMPALA - In collaboration with the Private Sector Foundation Uganda (PSFU), YAYELO, a fishery agency is targeting about 7,000 women and youth between 28-35 years to empower them with employment opportunities.

Micheal Tumusiime, the marketing officer at YAYELO, said the three-year project will benefit youth from the districts of Kampala, Wakiso and Jinja. He made the revelation during the last day of the seventh edition of the Harvest Money 2023 expo, which started on February 10 and ended on February 12.

The three-day expo that ran with the theme, Farming as a Business, Post-Harvest Handling and Value Addition, attracted big and small exhibitors who were showcasing what they can offer to the public.

There were also experts in different fields including poultry, piggery, goats, bee-keeping, coffee growing and value addition, urban and fishing farming, who were training the participants on how they can treat agriculture as a business.

During the event, people benefited from the technologies on display and expert information provided by at least over 500 exhibitors.

With a startup capital of sh95,000, which shall be offered as a form of a loan, Tumusiime mentioned that the beneficiaries will be able to make a net revenue of sh385,000 and more.

In a bid to eradicate poverty among the youth, he mentioned that they shall be given fish to venture into the value chain of wealth creation.

“We have partnered with financial institutions ready to offer loans to any beneficiary who purchases fish. We are looking at how these young people can generate income and improve their quality of life,” he added.

Tumusiime said YAYELO will partner with Community Based Organisations (CBOs) that are well structured to registered vulnerable youth, who will access these loans.

While serving spicy fish to the expo goers at their stall on Sunday, Tumusiime said with 78% of the population below 30 years, there is need for all stakeholders to find possible ways to solve the unemployment burden that has become a biting issue.

The Uganda Bureau of Standards 2017 figures indicate that the unemployment rate standards in Uganda are at 9.2% nationally while youth unemployment stands at 13%.

While serving spicy fish to the expo goers at their stall on Sunday, Tumusiime said with 78% of the population below 30 years, there is need for all stakeholders to find possible ways to solve the unemployment burden that has become a biting issue.

The same report shows that 41% or 3.8 million youth are not in Employment Education Training (NEET).

That said, it is worrying to note that 70% of Uganda’s population are youth below the age of 30.

Source: New Vision